NOAA shares first images from GOES-T weather satellite to improve forecasts for the West

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On Wednesday morning, NOAA shared the first images produced by the recently launched GOES-T weather satellite. GOES-T was sent into orbit aboard Cape Canaveral’s Atlas-V rocket on March 10. Once operational, it will provide vital information given to meteorologists, especially those making forecasts for the western United States. | VIDEO ABOVE | How NASA’s new weather satellite will help track and predict wildfires The GOES-T satellite is equipped with an instrument called the Advanced Baseline Imager, which collects data and produces images through 16 different channels. Each channel essentially looks at the atmosphere through a different lens, highlighting different important features. Two of these channels will produce a visible satellite image, a true color image of what is happening below. You see that our KCRA 3 weather team often uses visible satellite images when talking about their forecast. Other channels will provide information on cloud temperatures, atmospheric humidity, smoke plumes, fog and lightning strikes with pinpoint accuracy. For Northern California, this means better predictions for events such as atmospheric rivers, wildfire behavior, and severe thunderstorms. GOES-18 will eventually replace GOES-17, which currently sits over the western United States. Shortly after launch, GOES-17 began experiencing problems with its cooling system. This cooling system has been redesigned to avoid similar issues with GOES-18. So far, NOAA scientists say the instruments are working as expected. It will continue testing, validation and calibration exercises over the coming months. GOES-18 is expected to become fully operational early next year.

On Wednesday morning, NOAA shared the first images produced by the recently launched GOES-T weather satellite.

GOES-T was sent into orbit aboard an Atlas-V rocket from Cape Canaveral on March 10. Once operational, it will provide vital data to meteorologists, especially those making forecasts for the western United States.

Images taken from the satellite’s perch 22,000 miles above Earth show the kind of detail this new data can provide.

| VIDEO ABOVE | How NASA’s new weather satellite will help track and predict wildfires

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NOAA’s GOES-T satellite will capture 16 different types of images. Each image offers a different view of the atmosphere and the ground below, providing many tools for forecasters to analyze when forecasting.

The GOES-T satellite is equipped with an instrument called the Advanced Baseline Imager, which collects data and produces images through 16 different channels. Each channel essentially looks at the atmosphere through a different lens, highlighting different important features.

Two of these channels will produce a visible satellite image, a true color image of what is happening below. You see that our KCRA 3 weather team often uses visible satellite images when talking about their forecast.

Other channels will provide information on cloud temperatures, atmospheric humidity, smoke plumes, fog and lightning strikes with pinpoint accuracy.

For Northern California, this means better predictions for events such as atmospheric rivers, wildfire behavior, and severe thunderstorms.

GOES-18 will eventually replace GOES-17, which currently sits over the western United States. Shortly after launch, GOES-17 began experiencing problems with its cooling system. This cooling system has been redesigned to avoid similar issues with GOES-18.

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So far, NOAA scientists say the instruments are working as expected. It will continue testing, validation and calibration exercises over the coming months.

GOES-18 is expected to become fully operational early next year.

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